Notre-Dama du Puy Grasse Cathedral

The cathedral dates from the mid-13th century (the bishopric was transferred from Antibes to Grasse in 1244). The architecture is influenced by both Liguria and Lombardy (layout, decorative elements, vaulting).
The main facade is simple and unassuming, reflecting the interior layout : a raised central nave and two side aisles.

In the 18th century, a crypt was dug beneath the cathedral and the interior tiling and steps were redone. The central doorway became the sole entrance through the façade, reached by a double staircase, with a statue of the Virgin above it.

La Maison Du Patrimoine

The CDM hosts exhibition spaces and educational workshops: essential and inseparable elements of heritage mediation, core business of the national network of Cities and Countries of Art and History (VPAH). You will also find the whole of the Pole Mediation (lecturers and administrative guides), the Inventory Pole (Research on movable heritage, monumental and intangible), a documentation center and a presentation of the VPAH network.

Le Petit Train

Wind through a maze of steep, colorful lanes aboard Grasse’s Little Tourist Train, “Le Petit Train,” and discover the architectural treasures of the perfume capital of the world. This enchanting and entertaining ride takes you through the ages, exploring the history of perfume and the city’s famous personalities, all recounted individually and in several languages by virtue of scripted audio guides.

Over the course of this 35-minute trip, the train will take you through the historic streets and charming, narrow alleyways of Grasse’s city center.

Villa Saint-Hilaire

Home, Garden, & Landscape Resource Center

La Villa Saint-Hilaire, formerly the municipal library, is now a Home, Garden, and Landscape Resource Center which was officially unveiled on May 29, 2015.

The content, book, media, and educational selection focuses on the individual relationship between man and nature, dovetailing heritage and public reading opportunities.

This library is organized in sections – Landscape and Region/Garden/ Home/Lifestyle – and can satisfy younger groups (ages six and up), as well as adults and university-level academics.

Fragonard museum

The Fragonard Museum is set within the Hôtel de Villeneuve, a magnificent historic building that has reclaimed its original luster of a grand 18th-century Grasse mansion.

Dedicated to Grasse’s most famous son, painter Jean-Honoré Fragonard (1732-1806), the museum displays over a dozen major works by this great artist.

It also houses a collection of paintings of two other Grasse artists, Marguerite Gérard (1761-1837) and Jean-Baptiste Mallet (1759-1835).

Provencal costume and jewelry Museum

Former residence of the Marquise de Cabris, Mirabeau’s sister, the Clapier-Cabris mansion has housed the Musée Provençal du Costume et du Bijou (the Provence Costume and Jewelry Museum) since 1997.

This exceptional private collection, patiently gathered by Hélène Costa, is comprised of 18th and 19th century Provencal costumes and jewelry, including dresses, quilted petticoats, lace finery, and hair adornments.

These clothes tell the story of the lives of the women peasants, artisans, and city dwellers of Provence.

Hours and group tour: More information

Musée de la Marine - Mémorial Amiral de Grasse

Museum devoted to the life and career of a great sailor from Provence and his companions: François-Joseph Paul Count of Grasse (1722-1788).

Museum devoted to the life and career of a great sailor from Provence and his companions: François-Joseph Paul Count of Grasse (1722-1788).

Thirty models of ships are exhibited.

In winning the naval battle of the Chesapeake September 5, 1781, Admiral de Grasse ended the war of independence of the United States of America.

Annual closure in November.

Free entry

Fragonard Villa Museum

This elegant, late-17th century country manor, boasting a magnificent garden, houses the works of the famous Grasse painter Jean-Honoré Fragonard and his descendants.

This gallant champion of love painted four beautiful scenes entitled The Progress of Love for Comtesse du Barry, the King’s mistress.

Today, replicas of these beautiful paintings adorn the salons of the museum.